Pointe au Baril Light

Many lighthouses take the names of the bodies of land on which they stand, but this body of land got its name from its first light. To guide boats into the dangerous channel here, early residents set a lantern atop a barrel. Years later, they made improvements to the crude beacon - the top and bottom of the barrel were removed, it was turned on its side, and the lantern was placed inside. Thus, sailors could only see the light when they looked at the barrel straight on, making this a unique range light. In 1889 "real" range lights were built here, and both are still standing. The front range lighthouse is built on a beautiful stone foundation that, because the structure is set into a hill, is most apparent beneath the tower, which is closest to the water's edge. The keeper's dwelling is a modest 1 1/2-storey white house with a bright red roof and matching trim. A short, enclosed walkway connects the house to the square, white 30-foot-high tower, which narrows as it rises. Bright red overhangs cap the narrow windows of the walkway and the tower plus the doorway at its base. The red is repeated on the wide platform and railing surrounding the six-sided lantern room and its cap. Accessibility: Not open to the public - accessible by boat only